Me, spilling out all my thoughts, inner and outer, on just about anything! Lots of poetry, short stories from past experiences, anecdotes about teaching elementary school, music, relationships....garage sale type thing...Something For Everyone!

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Believe in Santa

This is the most touching Christmas memories that I've received on e-mail this year. I don't know who wrote it..perhaps Santa himself.
Believe in Santa Claus


I remember my first Christmas adventure with Grandma.
I was just a kid.
I remember tearing across town on my bike to visit her on the day my big sister dropped the bomb:
"There is no Santa Claus," she jeered. "Even dummies know that!"
My Grandma was not the gushy kind, never had been. I fled to her that day because I knew she would be straight with me. I knew Grandma always told the truth, and I knew that the truth always went down a whole lot easier when swallowed with one of her "world- famous" cinnamon buns. I knew they were world-famous, because Grandma said so. It had to be true.

Grandma was home, and the buns were still warm.
Between bites, I told her everything. She was ready for me.
"No Santa Claus?" she snorted...."Ridiculous! Don't believe it. That rumor has been going around for years, and it makes me mad, plain mad!! Now, put on your coat, and let's go."

"Go? Go where, Grandma?" I asked. I hadn't even finished my second world-famous cinnamon bun. "Where" turned out to be Kerby's General Store, the one store in town that had a little bit of just about everything. As we walked through its doors, Grandma handed me ten dollars.

That was a bundle in those days. "Take this money," she said, "and buy something for someone who needs it. I'll wait for you in the car." Then she turned and walked out of Kerby's.

I was only eight years old. I'd often gone shopping with my mother, but never had I shopped for anything all by myself.

The store seemed big and crowded, full of people scrambling to finish their Christmas shopping. For a few moments I just stood there, confused, clutching that ten-dollar bill, wondering what to buy, and who on earth to buy it for.
I thought of everybody I knew: my family, my friends, my neighbors, the kids at school, the people who went to my church.

I was just about thought out, when I suddenly thought of Bobby Decker. He was a kid with bad breath and messy hair, and he sat right behind me in Mrs. Pollock's grade-two class.
Bobby Decker didn't have a coat. I knew that because he never went out to recess during the winter. His mother always wrote a note, telling the teacher that he had a cough, but all we kids knew that Bobby Decker didn't have a cough; he didn't have a good coat. I fingered the ten-dollar bill with growing excitement. I would buy Bobby Decker a coat!

I settled on a red corduroy one that had a hood to it. It looked real warm, and he would like that.
"Is this a Christmas present for someone?" the lady behind the counter asked kindly, as I laid my ten dollars down.
"Yes, ma'am," I replied shyly. "It's for Bobby."
The nice lady smiled at me, as I told her about how Bobby really needed a good winter coat. I didn't get any change, but she put the coat in a bag, smiled again, and wished me a Merry Christmas.

That evening, Grandma helped me wrap the coat Christmas paper and ribbons and wrote, "To Bobby, From Santa Claus" on it.
(A little tag fell out of coat, and Grandma tucked it in her Bible.) Grandma said that Santa always insisted on secrecy. Then she drove me over to Bobby Decker's house, explaining as we went that I was now and forever officially, one of Santa's helpers.

Grandma parked down the street from Bobby's house, and she and I crept noiselessly and hid in the bushes by his front walk. Then Grandma gave me a nudge. "All right, Santa Claus," she whispered, "get going."
I took a deep breath, dashed for his front door, threw the present down on his step, pounded his door and flew back to the safety of the bushes and Grandma.
Together we waited breathlessly in the darkness for the front door to open. Finally it did, and there stood Bobby.

Fifty years haven't dimmed the thrill of those moments spent shivering, beside my Grandma, in Bobby Decker's bushes.
That night, I realized that those awful rumors about Santa Claus were just what Grandma said they were -- ridiculous. Santa was alive and well, and we were on his team.

I still have the Bible, with the coat tag tucked inside: $19.95.
May you always have LOVE to share, HEALTH to spare and FRIENDS that care...
And may you always believe in the magic of Santa Claus!

Mother of Invention, with my belief in Santa firmly in place.

22 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I REALLY want this story to be true! I'll choose to think so.

(as I listen to "A Charlie Brown Christmas" CD)

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This was a wonderful story to share! I want to be that kind of grandmother - the kind that doesn't believe in rumours and shows that love is just another name for Santa. Thanks MOI.

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

 
Blogger Barbara said...

I loved this story. I remember when I learned the truth about Santa Claus when I was just about 8. I was so determined not to believe it. I wish someone had offered to make me into one of Santa's helpers at that time!

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

 
Blogger Mother of Invention said...

Bob:It IS true! I'm a believer from way back! I have a note back from him to prove it!

Pauline: You're welcome..I was very touched by this story too. I'm sure you will be the kind of grandmother you want to be!

Barbara: Glad you liked this one! Most e-mails are junky but this one really caught my eye and heart. My sister told me at age 7 but I never did believe what she told me! Good thing...she told me pretty wild things she just made up so I already had a big tip-off for this one!

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Oh WOW!! that is the best true christmas story Ive read. im going to narrate it to my kids tomorrow.

thenak you so much for leaving a comment on my blog, becos now ive been able to see yours.

Very well narrated... I was there with you with every word. :)

Merry Christmas to you and joy filled hoildays!

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

 
Blogger OldOldLady Of The Hills said...

Wonderful story....One hopes that Bobby LOVED his coat and that it kept him warm...! I love that "Grandma" filled in with the rest of the money for that coat....I dearly hope that we are ALL Santa's Helper's, each and every year...plus all the other days of the year that people help other people in need!
THAT is the spirit of Christmas to me.

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

 
Anonymous chase said...

what a touching story. I really like it. It reminds me of those stories from the Chicken soup for the soul.

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Blogger Mother of Invention said...

Mystic Rose: Thanks. You'll read it to your own kids or kids you teach? Have a great Christmas!

Old Old Lady: I love the Grandma top-up twist! The coat was surely the warmest and cosiest ever!Everyone has a bit of Santa in them.

Chase: Yes, you're right! And of course, a chef would notice that! HA!

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Very sweet!

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Blogger Maggie said...

Oh MOI, I'm crying more Christmas tears this morning. That was just lovely. Thank you so much for sharing that beautiful story.

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Great story, Mother. Regarding our politics down here in the USA, there's nothing to follow anymore. It's pretty much the Bush show and we're being dismantled, piece by piece as he sells us out to the highest bidder.

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Did Grandma pay the remaining 9.95? I got the impression that the sales clerk took the $10.00 as full payment - discounted the sale - so that the child could do his act of Christmas charity. I like this interpretation because it lets the store clerk participate in the perpetuation of Santa and the true meaning of Christmas.

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Blogger bobealia said...

I can imagine the illustrations to go with the book. Maybe you could re-write it to make it yours and get it published?
I could illustrate it...
It's a wonderful tale about believing.

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

my own kids :) i have three.

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Blogger Mother of Invention said...

Old Lady: The Sweetest!

Maggie: It touched you as it did me then!

Stephen:Thanks. Glad you read it.Yes, I'm beginning to see just how bad it all is. Most bloggers,the only Americans I hear, seem to agree with you.

Bob: I guess the story leaves it up to you to decide. I thought the grandma and store clerk were in on it together.

Bobealia: I'm sure you could write AND illustrate it!
Wish I knew who wrote it.

Mystic Rose: Ah, they'll love it!

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks for sharing this lovely story! What a considerate and thoughtful Grandma! It's really touching....

Thursday, December 21, 2006

 
Blogger steve said...

You got me spillin' out all over the place now... i have heard this story before but, somehow, it works better from the context of your site!!! Merry Christmas!!!

Thursday, December 21, 2006

 
Blogger Mother of Invention said...

fennymun:Yep, it sure caught me hard.

Steve: You're such a cool sap! Thanks.
You too, you old Miracle on 34th!

Thursday, December 21, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

That is so sweet! And touching. And you made me cry. That's just not right. What a lovely story.

Friday, December 22, 2006

 
Blogger Mother of Invention said...

Brooksba: I got a tear in my eye too!

Saturday, December 23, 2006

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

OOooo, shivery feelings all down my spine - How I love this sort of story!

How could anyone doubt Santa exists? Why, I watch his journey on Norad every year!!! (I have to, to make sure the kids get to bed on time for his arrival! :-D )

Saturday, December 23, 2006

 
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